Tag Archives: You Were Never Really Here

Eavesdropping at the Movies: 107 – Widows

José falls in love with Widows, a portrait of life and survival in modern America in the skin of a heist film. Mike can see exactly why he should love it, but just doesn’t click with it.

Based on Lynda La Plante’s 1983 ITV series of the same name, Widows sees three women lose their criminal husbands in a heist gone wrong, and their attempt to complete their final job with the promise of a big payoff. The film draws parallels between urban gang violence and entrenched political dynasties, complicates the widows’ grief with sex and intimacy, and constructs the potential payoff not as a cause of celebration but as a way out of bad situations. José finds the film a visual marvel, layered and expressive, but to Mike it’s more a reminder of what he loved so deeply about You Were Never Really Here than great in its own right.

The podcast can be listened to in the players above or on iTunes.

With José Arroyo of First Impressions and Michael Glass of Writing About Film.

Eavesdropping at the Movies 51 – You Were Never Really Here

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If there’s ever a movie that needs to be seen on a big screen this is it. A poetic film, a great film made by a great artist. A story that’s told aurally and visual using a wide range of devices. We discuss the extraordinary power of its images, the imaginative use of sound, the depiction  of violence; whether it has a psychologically traumatised editing pattern; how it’s a film that requires visual literacy and what that might mean; the narrative is that of an abused child who goes to the military, suffers post-traumatic stress syndrome and eventually becomes a hitman who’s sent on a quest to rescue a young girl who’s been trafficked sexually. A linear story told in a fragmented way with the narrative making — and changing — sense as it unfolds. Mike is excellent. I remember names better than usually.  At the end of the podcast, we comment on the oscars describing debates the broadcast led to and we forgot to include that engendered by the best foreign language winner: A Fantastic Woman.

 

 

The podcast can be listened to in the player above or on iTunes.

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José Arroyo and Michael Glass of Writing About Film.