It’s A Wonderful Life (Frank Capra, USA, 1946)

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frank capra's it's a wonderful life

James Stewart is so great in It’s a Wonderful Life: the repressed fury, frustration, the dashed hopes sometimes relieved by an evident yearning, the bitterness, all dazzlingly displayed by the actor and sometimes captured by Capra in a sweeping extreme close-up that swoops up on that anguished face and confronts the audience with it. A marvel of a performance, beautifully directed.

The film’s a holiday staple, and everyone’s seen it several times, but it’s much darker than one remembers; George Bailey is after all a man driven to suicide at Christmas. The warm feelings the memory of the film gives rise to seem due to the beginning (the view of community communicated through the idealised Bedford Falls), and then the very last scene (the utopian view of friends and family at Christmas), and one forgets most of what leads up to it.

It is after all the story of a man whose every hope is thwarted: he doesn’t get to go to college, he doesn’t get to travel around the world, he doesn’t even get to go on a honeymoon. Duty, obligation, responsibility, the need and well-being of others, all take precedence over his own wishes and thwart him at every turn.

The only desire he manages to achieve is that for his wife, and even that seems to catch him by surprise (and Capra’s staging of this, in close-up, whilst they seem to be talking about everything else but, manages to somehow indicate that desire growing off-screen as a both a physical manifestation and as a dawning of feeling – a tour de force of staging). As my friend Nicky Smith observed, one is reminded of the episode of Friends where Phoebe says it ought to be called ‘It’s a Sucky Life’.

It’s a crime that the film has been colourised as the black and white cinematography by Joseph Walker in the original is so beautiful. It’s really shot as a noir and even Sunny Bedford Falls is enmeshed in shadows. But it’s no surprise that dramatically the film works even when in colour. It’s a marvel of story-telling: the prayers going up to the heavens, the Heavenly spirits being made aware of the happenings of those normally too insignificant to bother with; the setting forth of a life, the way the story arrests time, speeds it up; the creation of an alternate universe; the ability to identify with George even as he looks forth on his own life and on a world without him in it. In telling us the story, the film also seems to be saying, ‘this is what cinema can be. It can do anything. Isn’t it in itself heavenly’?

It’s a film full of delights: the set-piece of the opening dance where they all end up in the swimming pool; the scene where Donna Reed loses her robe; the run on the bank; the camera rushing alongside George running through Bedford Falls and through Pottersville; Thomas Mitchell’s wonderful characterization of George’s uncle; Gloria Grahame’s even more delightful characterization of the hottest girl in town (‘this ole thing. I only wear it when I don’t care what I look like’).

Seeing it recently on a big screen,I liked it more than I ever have and found it better than I remembered though one has to accept some things being what they are (bits of capracorn, the sexism, the tinge of racism — all no worse than in any other film of the period — but there nonetheless). There are problems with the film: Did Capra really believe that being an old maid librarian is the worst thing that could befall a woman outside of becoming a prostitute?; doesn’t Pottersville look a lot more fun than Bedford Falls? But what are these next to James Stewart’s towering performance, surely one of the very greatest in the history of cinema, and next to the dazzling display of filmic story-telling that Capra and Co put on display?

Addendum: In his recent How to Watch a Movie (London: Profile Books, 2015), David Thomson intriguingly writes that ‘in the decades since its first showing, it has grown easier for audiences to imagine a question mark in the title and to realize that the idyllic Bedford Falls of 1947 has turned into Pottersville, the drab plan of heartless capitalism pursued by the town’s tycoon (played by Lionel Barrymore)..think of that story shifted to the era of 2008 and the anxieties of middle-class existence. Once upon a time It’s a Wonderful Life was a Christmas staple, but try showing the picture to a modern young audience without rueful irony crushing nostalgia.’ I wonder if he’s right.

José Arroyo

4 thoughts on “It’s A Wonderful Life (Frank Capra, USA, 1946)

    Anonymous said:
    December 21, 2015 at 9:47 pm

    Nice post José. I recently taught Wonderful Life again, after a 6 year hiatus! (I also acquired it on Blu-ray, and it’s a very nice transfer indeed.) Have you read George Toles’s piece on the film in his book A House Made of Light? His account really opened my eyes to the how much the film’s effectiveness is tied up with the way that in scene after scene, we are caught by surprise, with respect to logic and emotion, by how the scene ends, considering where it begins. The sequence running from the dance to the wedding night displays this tendency especially well. Toles describes Capra as being like a mad gambler (though I think he might be quoting someone else), and points out that Capra would say that every time he tried to tell the story of the film in words, it would fall apart. The film’s effectiveness is especially reliant upon it carrying you along emotionally. And Toles agrees with you (and I agree with you both): the version of Mary we see in Pottersville is a failing of the film, a rare moment where imagination and invention flag.

    Like

      NotesonFilm1 responded:
      December 21, 2015 at 10:12 pm

      Thanks! I haven’t read the Toles though I do have the book somewhere so shall look for it. I do understand the problem of trying to tell the story in words and failing. That’s one of the film’s many great strengths.

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        jameszborowski said:
        December 21, 2015 at 10:53 pm

        I didn’t mean to comment anonymously! ‘Twas I: James Zborowski! Happy Christmas!

        Like

        NotesonFilm1 responded:
        December 21, 2015 at 11:38 pm

        Oh, even better. Lovely to hear from you James.

        Liked by 1 person

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