Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, USA, 2006)

Posted on Updated on

Image

The story of the tragic queen, a kind of contextual preamble to the French Revolution, shot as a tragic teen film. The film is a sumptuous, lively production, amongst the most beautiful and entertaining films of the last decade, distinguished by its use of music, its beautiful mise-en-scène and its evocation of a long-gone world in a way that makes it timely and relevant. Sets, props, and costumes have to be amongst the loveliest ever. Clearly, a lot of that is due to the period itself, but credit must also be given to the filmmakers in having the wit and knowledge to see the value in conveying it in a way that allows a contemporary audience to understand and appreciate it. The film is wonderful at showing the enervated obsessions with lifestyle, entertainment, shopping and consumption, so similar to that of our own epoch, as a frenzied refusal of unshakeable anomie, one doomed to failure. Everything about the film evokes a delicious dialectic between luxe and loss. Kirsten Dunst, at the peak of her melancholic beauty, is peerless as the tragic queen, doing her dutiful best to please other, and when failing, which is most of the time, at least striving to please herself; but Dunst’s face palpably evokes a foretaste of doom, as if all the palaces, clothes and jewels with which she tries to shoo away boredom and the burden of duty, will not keep her from her fate. Jason Schwartzman as Louis XVI is almost as good, though he doesn’t erase the memory of Robert Morley as she does that of Norma Shearer in the 1938 version directed by W.S. Van Dyke. Yet another masterpiece from Sofia Coppola.

PS

 

Worth noting that as Rosalind Galt  in her great Pretty: Film and the Decorative Image (Film and Cutlure Series: New York: Columbia University Press, 2011) rightly  points out ‘Sofia Copppola’s Marie Antonette (2006) addresses precisely the relationships among rococo style, radical politics, and gender, but its deconstructive deployment of the Versailles decorative regime prompted critical response to view the films as equally clueless as its protagonist. If we regard the film as something other than a discourse on girly frivolity, it is possible to read its emphasis on the decorative image as precisely the location of its political intervention’ (loc 336 on the Kindle edition).

 

José Arroyo

3 thoughts on “Marie Antoinette (Sofia Coppola, USA, 2006)

    tankawanka said:
    April 27, 2013 at 12:39 pm

    Of all her films, this is the one which has stuck with me the least. I seem to recall enjoying it, but am much more fond of Lost in Translation and Somewhere, which I didn’t expect to like at all but I found quite moving.

    Like

    NotesonFilm1 said:
    April 27, 2013 at 1:22 pm

    Of all her films, Somewhere is the one I ended up choosing for one of my courses (though maybe only because I expected everyone to have seen Lost in Translation, which is another great film); and I suppose I felt as you do on Marie Antoinette when it first came out; but it’s it’s grown in my estimation upon re-viewing. Sofia Coppola is a truly great director.

    Like

    […] to a girl (e.g. The Virgin Suicides), the pleasure and power of pretty things in a shallow world (Marie Antoinette), but also what a culture so heavily centred on the acquisition of those things does to people. […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s